Literary Review

Literary Review

Month: November 2017

It’s Time to Talk

It’s Time to Talk

By: Colleen King The world is in turmoil: not only because someone has their finger on a red self-destruct button that will make the world explode, and not only because of the countless hurricanes, tornados, and earthquakes that have been claiming the lives of million, […]

Entertain Us—Women in the Entertainment Workplace

Entertain Us—Women in the Entertainment Workplace

By: Anne Lacey Being a woman is impossible in this world. Women are constantly surrounded by criticism for what we wear, what we say, and even some of the decisions that we make. Criticism is everywhere, and is especially prevalent surrounding women that are in […]

To Be a Swimmer

To Be a Swimmer

By: Nicole Farina Sometimes on the first day of class, a teacher will ask you to describe yourself or to explain “who you are” to your classmates. My answer to this question has not changed once in over fifteen years: “I’m Nicole Farina, and I’m […]

Harvey Weinstein’s Accusers Were Not Asking For It

Harvey Weinstein’s Accusers Were Not Asking For It

By: Caleigh Flegg Me, too. If you have not been looking at the news for the last few weeks, you might not understand the power behind those two words. What seems like a simple affirmation takes on new meaning when it is written on a […]

Let’s Talk About It: A Review of Harriet Jacobs’s Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl and Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird in the Context of Censorship

Let’s Talk About It: A Review of Harriet Jacobs’s Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl and Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird in the Context of Censorship

By: Jenna Seyer As a society of binaries, we tend to put people in boxes. We live in a world of black and white, of rich and poor, of Democrat and Republican, failing to recognize that we are all human.  Some fight to take down […]

All the Light We Cannot See:  Exposing the Mechanisms of the Mind

All the Light We Cannot See: Exposing the Mechanisms of the Mind

By: Nicole Elliott Lights out. Remain in silence. For now, just listen: A demonic horde. Upended sacks of beans. A hundred broken rosaries. There are a thousand metaphors and all of them are inadequate: forty bombs per aircraft, four hundred and eighty altogether, seventy two […]

Interview with Elizabeth Duquette, An Expert on American Literature in the 19th-Century

Interview with Elizabeth Duquette, An Expert on American Literature in the 19th-Century

Elizabeth Duquette specializes in nineteenth-century American literature, trans-Atlantic literary culture, critical theory, and intellectual history. Now an English professor at Gettysburg College, she received her B.A. in Philosophy from Dartmouth College and her Ph.D. in American Literature from New York University. Duquette’s first book, Loyal Subjects: Bonds of Nation, Race, and Allegiance […]

“Stupidity: I Highly Recommend It”

“Stupidity: I Highly Recommend It”

By: Nicole Elliott The never-ending crisis about the state of humanity is hilariously commented on in The School For Lies. The constantly changing love triangles between Frank, Celemine, Eliante, Philante, Clitander, Oronte, and Acaste, and the ridiculous nature of all of their characters make the […]

The School for Lies: Satire or Slander?

The School for Lies: Satire or Slander?

By: Jenna Seyer The School for Lies, a 2011 comedy-adaptation by David Ives of Moliere’s 1666 The Misanthrope, had its opening night on Thursday, October 26 at Gettysburg College’s Kline Theater. This production translates 17th-century France into present-day verse, borrowing Moliere’s plot points, but adding […]

Consequences of War: Miss Burma and its Strive for Personal Identity

Consequences of War: Miss Burma and its Strive for Personal Identity

By: Jenna Seyer Miss Burma, a historical novel, is a powerfully moving narrative of a family living during one of the most violent periods of history. Written by Charmaine Craig, Miss Burma traces the hardships of both Benny and Khin. Throughout its account of a […]

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