Literary Review

Literary Review

Month: October 2017

Stages

Stages

By: Kimberly Brown Danez Smith is a black, queer American poet who was born in St. Paul, Minnesota. They are well renowned for slam poetry, but began to move away from that form of poetry, producing their own books of poems. Smith’s earlier book titled [insert] boy came out […]

Surviving A Shattered Home: Jeannette Walls

Surviving A Shattered Home: Jeannette Walls

By: Elisabeth French In her memoir The Glass Castle, established gossip columnist Jeannette Walls details her unconventional childhood growing up with an alcoholic father and unstable mother. Walls takes a new turn in her writing by depicting her parents and all their faults. Walls surpasses the […]

The Challenging Intimacy of Roxanne Gay’s Hunger

The Challenging Intimacy of Roxanne Gay’s Hunger

By: Morgan Hubbard In her latest memoir, Roxanne Gay buries the reader in the devastating beginnings of her battle with her body. She moves her shovel back and forth between peril of the present and pictures of the past to understand her struggle with weight. As […]

Diving Deep—A Review of Manhattan Beach by Jennifer Egan

Diving Deep—A Review of Manhattan Beach by Jennifer Egan

By: Anne Lacey The last time we heard a headline with Jennifer Egan’s name in it was seven years ago. In 2010 she won a Pulitzer Prize for fiction for her novel, A Visit from the Goon Squad, but now we are not hearing about […]

Miss Burma is a Novel of the Past that Could Impact Our Future

Miss Burma is a Novel of the Past that Could Impact Our Future

By: Caleigh Flegg Many readers may pigeonhole novels like Charmaine Craig’s Miss Burma as a just a “war story”, something to come over in the search for a beach read. The contents of the novel are staggeringly painful, something the casual reader does not always […]

Seeing the Sea in Jennifer Egan’s Manhattan Beach

Seeing the Sea in Jennifer Egan’s Manhattan Beach

By: Nicole Farina The Pulitzer Prize winning author of A Visit From the Goon Squad tests new waters in Manhattan Beach. Jennifer Egan’s latest novel, a work of historical fiction—a new field for the seasoned writer—makes one long to have grown up in New York […]

Who Would Daisy Miller Be Today?

Who Would Daisy Miller Be Today?

By: Nicole Elliot Two thousand seventeen has been a year of political upheaval. Anyone who previously believed that society was peacefully approaching social and political justice in America was forcefully woken up by the election, women’s rights issues, racial tensions, and many more protests turned […]

Tatiana de Rosnay’s Sarah’s Key: A Permanence of History into the Present-Day A Review by Jenna Seyer

Tatiana de Rosnay’s Sarah’s Key: A Permanence of History into the Present-Day A Review by Jenna Seyer

By: Jenna Seyer Tatiana de Rosnay’s Sarah’s Key, a historical-fiction novel and New York Times Bestseller  traces the lives of two main characters who struggle to survive the horrors of the Holocaust and Nazi Germany. The French translation of the title is Elle s’appelait Sarah. The […]

Emily St. John Mandel’s “Station Eleven”

Emily St. John Mandel’s “Station Eleven”

By: Colleen King “You never know what tomorrow will bring.” It’s a phrase that most people hear time and time again. Modern culture manipulates this idea as a way to instill fear of the future. However, Emily St. John Mandel, brings this concept to a […]

The Process of Discovery in Writing

The Process of Discovery in Writing

By: Nicole Farina Creative fiction writer Fred Leebron is the author of hundreds of short stories, personal essays, three novels, and even an anthology. A graduate from Princeton University, Johns Hopkins University, and the University of Iowa, he’s since put his degrees to good use […]

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